Email, tech and security blog

Releases 4.2 and 4.3

Meet Classy and Cody - Halon releases 4.2 and 4.3

We have done two new releases of Halon since last time we updated the blog with release matters. In Halon 4.1 “teamy”, released just before this summer, we introduced modules. A month later we followed up with 4.2 “classy”

New features for the end-user interface

Have you checked out our open-source end-user interface on GitHub? It can be used either as it is, modified to fit your needs, or only as an inspiration for your own code. Since last time we posted about it, we have updated it with a bunch of goodies, have a look and feel free to give us some feedback if you decide to try it.

How to test SMTP servers using the command-line

In certain situations it can be very helpful to be able to quickly check if a SMTP server is online and reachable, has support for TLS and that it's working, test user authentication and measure transaction delays and throughput. All of this and more can be done quickly using the command-line. Here's your guide!

Using reCAPTCHA to handle spam misclassification

Today's leading spam filter technologies offer a very high degree of accuracy. In this blog I'll describe the current state of spam classification, and propose a pretty innovative method that can significantly improve both senders' and recipients' satisfaction (as well as reducing the burden on administrators and support staff) by enabling senders to report false positives if they pass a CAPTCHA test. Let's start by familiarising ourselves with the history of anti-spam.

End-user improvements and new integrations with cPanel and Odin

Although many customers prefer to use the Halon SMTP Platform as-is, most hosting providers want to implement end-user interfaces in order to offer a higher degree of customer self-service. Since the Halon SMTP platform is essentially a scriptable MTA (with many features such as anti-spam, signing, and much more) with an
Coloured stripes

Making PHP's SOAP client asynchronous

Most web projects uses client-side JavaScript to handle concurrency, because of its asynchronous and callback-based nature. In some cases however, it's desirable to achieve concurrency on the server side. One example could be the processing of sensitive data, that has to be filtered before handed to the client. In our case, it was a data size issue that triggered us to implement a concurrent SOAP

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