Halon 4.4 "lofty" packed with small improvements

Halon 4.4 Lofty

The 4.4 release “lofty” is all about fixing bugs, boost existing features, and improve performance and memory management in the Halon script engine. And like macOS “High Sierra”, it’s fully baked.

The unusually long changelog contains many small improvements. We’ve given the pre/post-delivery script a slight overhaul. It’s now possible to tailor the bounce behaviour via the the SetDNS() function. Additionally, we’ve added $action and $context, as well as functions to set MAIL/RCPT parameters. Finally, the SetSouceIP() enables you to choose an IPv4 and IPv6 address pair, which is a great when you want to provide customers with a private IPv4 and IPv6 or if you want to use diverse address pools.

The improved “Listen on” directive on the Server > SMTP listener page enables more fine-grained control over listen ports and IPs; such as listening on different ports for different IPs.

Quirks and fun trivia

– We recently revised our LDAP implementation, and realised that our own syntax and mechanism for failover between hosts is rather superfluous, since OpenLDAP supports that natively. Consequently, we adopted the standard LDAP URI’s in our configuration, and existing configurations will be automatically migrated.

– While we support the PROXY protocol (v1) that passes client source IP information from load balancers, we thought it was mostly as HAProxy thing. Apparently, it’s used by many other load balancers such as Amazon ELB, Citrix Netscaler, and F5 BIG-IP. Most of them implements the version 1 (which is human readable), but there is a second version of the protocol that’s binary-packed, and have a quite smart feature: its magic string (protocol identification) is \x0D\x0A\x0D\x0A\x00\x0D\x0A\x51\x55\x49\x54\x0A which translates into literal "\r\n\r\nQUIT\r\n", a string chosen specifically to case an error and disconnect against servers not supporting this protocol. Clever!

– If you have a IPv6 only datacenter, but still want to process IPv4 clients, you can do so with a SIIT-DC gateway which uses IPv4-mapped-IPv6 addresses. In Halon, you can use SIIT-DC while still performing IPv4 reputation (such as DNSBL), by extracting and setting the IPv4 address in the CONNECT script. If that doesn’t make the point that we’re very scriptable, then what does?

Image from Tore Anderson’s SIIT-DC presentation

If you ever had problems signing in to a Halon using Firefox, it can be because a recent change in how “secure cookies” are handled. When signing in over HTTPS, we set the secure cookie flag, which forbids the cookie to be send over a unencrypted HTTP connection to the same host. That is all great, but if you then try to sign in over HTTP (for whatever reason) Firefox will not be able to login because there is already a cookie for that domain with the secure flag and it cannot be replaced, nor accessed. We addressed this by using different cookie names for HTTP and HTTPS. Regardless of this fix, you should not use HTTP when administering your Halon hosts.

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