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Speaking at M3AAWG #45 in San Francisco

As a supporting member, we’re happy to be participating in our 7th meeting on February 18-21. M3AAWG meetings are an exceptional opportunity to discuss the latest in messaging security with other professionals in a focused environment of working sessions and educational panels.

We would be delighted if you joined the transport encryption session that I’m speaking at, on Wednesday. Also, if you want to meet up, just get in touch! We’re all around; product, sales and engineering.

Halon 5.0 “tidy” with new REST API

Photo by Steve Hodgson

We celebrate the new year with news on the upcoming release, which bundles many exciting features.

First and foremost, the new RESTful API with an OpenAPI specification makes integration into various development and deployment toolchains much more enjoyable. Since most of our customers already integrate Halon into their directories and control panels by making REST queries from Halon, it makes perfect sense that Halon can be provisioned in the same way.

$ curl https://halon1/api/1.0.0/email/queue
   -X PATCH
   -d '{"filter": "ip=192.0.2.1", "fields": {"transport": "srv2"}}'
   -u username:password
{
    "affected": 10
}

Secondly, we’re introducing a new end-of-DATA script that’s executed once per message, as opposed to the per-recipient DATA script. Whereas the per-recipient version is convenient when you want to treat each recipient individually and let the Halon software take care of queueing and consolidating the respective actions into an SMTP response, the per-message version gives you maximum flexibility and control over execution. The $transaction variable is populated gradually during the SMTP conversation with sender information, and an array with recipients accepted by each RCPT TO command. To then relay a message to its recipients, you call Queue() for each $transaction["recipients"] and then Accept(). Making per-recipient message modifications using the MIME() class is now easier thanks to the new snapshot() and restore() methods.

The code editor’s built-in CSV editor now supports custom form controls, defined like a “schema” on a per-file basis using a JSON format. You can use checkboxes for booleans, select controllers for enumerated types, and input fields with validation for things like dates, email addresses or any regular expression you like. It makes it much more convenient and safe to create and edit lists and settings that you want to have in your Halon configuration file.

There’s a new LDAP() class that replaces the previous ldap_ functions and LDAP settings in the configuration. It provides greater flexibility, and an improved usage pattern using an iterable LDAP result object.

Finally, there are massive under-the-hood improvements. There’s a new on-disk YAML configurations with JSON schemas and Protobuf control sockets, which is used by the componentised Linux package’s new Visual Studio Code plugin and command line tools. The integrated package is built on FreeBSD 12, which ships with OpenSSL 1.1 and thus TLS 1.3 support. It was published as a standard by IETF in August last year, and is much anticipated as it contains many security improvements over previous TLS versions. The queue database is now using the latest and greatest PostgreSQL version 11.1, and the queue is automatically migrated on boot as usual.

We have that you’ll like this new release as much as we do! Check out the full changelog on GitHub for more information, and familiarise yourself with the important changes outlined in the release notes document before upgrading.

Meet Halon at Smau Milano 2018

Halon are going to Smau 2018 in Milan on October 23-25, with our new distributor AnswerVAD. We have had the fortune to be introduced to this big Italian event through Massimo, the CEO of AnswerVAD. This is an innovation event, and a great place to be for announcing our presence in the region. We will be in a booth together with AnswerVAD. If you are interested of going there but don’t have a ticket, don’t hesitate to contact us and we will sign you up for free. Hope to se you in Milan!

Halon 4.7 “ahoy” and 4.8 “truly” with live debugging and HELO script

Halon 4.0 introduced a feature we call “live staging” where you can deploy multiple running configurations at the same time, with per-connection conditions. It allows you to reliably rollout changes or new features to a production system for only a few testing IPs, or a select percentage of the traffic. With Halon 4.7, we proudly present “live debugging” using which you can add logpoints to your scripts. It enables you to inspect the full context of SMTP transactions in real-time, using the live staging conditions as connection selector.

Those points are added directly to the Monaco-based IDE, and results are inspected on a per-connection basis. You can create multiple points, triggered by multiple messages, and jump back and forth between them.

We’ve also added a HELO/EHLO phase script, support for ARC in DKIMSign() and a full implementation of draft 18 on Github, EdDSA (ed25519) and a native boolean type with corresponding strict comparison operator. The standard library have many new functions such as rsa_sign() and verify, idna_encode() and decode, aes_encrypt() and decrypt.

We hope that the live debugging will come handy! Please see the changelog on Github for a full list of improvements and changes, or get in touch with us if you want more detailed information.

Using ARC to work around DMARC’s forwarder issues

Authenticated Received Chain (ARC) is a proposed standard that have been developed to help address issues with DMARC and certain forwarders, such as mailing lists. It defines a standard for how to pass authentication results from one intermediary to another, making this information available to the recipient system. It works even in the case of multiple intermediaries, a.k.a. a chain.

DMARC verifies the sender authenticity, as specified by the RFC5322.From header domain name, using SPF and DKIM. Certain indirect email flows such as mailing lists break this by altering the message, while maintaining the original From header. It causes issues for both senders that publish a DMARC policy, and receivers that verify DMARC. The two large mailbox providers AOL and Yahoo published a p=reject DMARC policy for their domains in 2014, causing some disruption for senders on those domains. It occurred when emailing recipients on mailbox services that verifies DMARC via for example mailing lists. This was, and still is, remedied by ad-hoc solutions.

ARC in itself isn’t a reputation system. The specification doesn’t define how the reputation of intermediates should be tracked, nor how public lists should be operated. In other words, as a recipient mailbox provider you still have to operate such systems in order to make use of the information that ARC provides. DMARC.org announced ARC at a M3AAWG meeting in Atlanta, 2015, where it’s been a frequent topic ever since.

include "authentication.header";
include "authentication.arc";

$chain = ARC::chainValidate();
if ($chain["status"] == "pass" or $chain["status"] == "none")
{
	ARC::seal(
			"201805", "example.com", "pki:arc",
			$chain,
			AuthenticationResults()
				->SPF(["smtp.client-ip" => $senderip])
				->DKIM()
				->DMARC()
				->addMethod("arc", $chain["status"], ["header.oldest-pass" => $chain["oldestpass"] ?? "0"])
				->toString()
		);
}

 

We have just released an implementation for ARC (draft 14) on Github, which supports both verification and (re)sealing. It’s written in Halon script, and we’re using it on our own domain to start with. If you’re interested in taking it for a spin, just let us know.

We attend TES security roundtable in London

The very successful TES security roundtable meetings are continuing. This time it brings us to London, UK on May 24th.

The meeting will revolve around DMARC, DANE, email encryption techniques, password protection and SMTP transport protection. Vittorio Bertola, Head of Policy and Innovation at Open-Xchange has assemblied a great line-up. The meeting is an exclusive invite-only event for people working with email infrastructure issues.

Let’s meet at M3AAWG #43 in Munich

M3AAWG meetings are an exceptional opportunity to discuss the latest in messaging security with other professionals in a focused environment of working sessions and educational panels. This time we meet in Munich, Germany. Leading industry experts, researchers and public policy officials address such diverse topics as bot mitigation practices, social networking abuse, mobile abuse and pending legislation.

As an official supporter member, we will of course participate in the Munich meeting on June 4th-7th. If you want to meet up, just get in touch!

Halon 4.6 “curry” with outbound anti-spam

You probably know from before that Halon’s scriptable SMTP server enable email providers to avoid blacklisting and increase deliverability. The 4.6 release, “curry”, contains Cyren’s outbound anti-spam (OAS). In combination with our cluster-synchronised rate limit function, it provides incredibly effective and accurate abuse prevention. Just like their Cyren’s inbound anti-spam, OAS uses a hash-sharing technology called recurrent pattern detection (RPD) that identifies outbreak patterns. It’s designed to detect spam from internal sources rather than external, and doesn’t report/contribute any signatures since it could blacklist your own infrastructure.

With the flexibility of scripting you can determine customer/sender identities accurately even in mixed traffic. This is used as identifier for rate limits based on classifiers such as Cyren’s OAS, delivery failure rate, queue size, etc. By using IP source hashing and alternative IPs for suspicious traffic, deferring obvious abuse and controlling connection concurrency, you can achieve high deliverability with minimal administration.

The 4.6 release comes with many additional features and improvements. It adds SNI support to the TLS functions. The Monaco-based code editor now have additional code completion, built-in documentation, tabs, and a mini-map.

For more information on the release, see the full changelog on GitHub. If you want to try Cyren’s outbound anti-spam, contact our sales team.

Halon 4.6 “funny” supporting our SMTP LANG extension

In the beginning, everything was ASCII and English. Since then, we’ve seen Unicode (international character sets) and IDN (international domains names) become widely adopted. Last year we implemented SMTPUTF8 that enables international mailboxes.

So why not support other languages in text-based protocols? We give to you “The SMTP Service Extension for Protocol Internationalization” RFC draft, introducing the EHLO keyword LANG. It will be the first SMTP software to support our to-be submitted RFC draft. Initially it will support Swedish, Spanish and Australian, and will default to Swedish when talking to supported systems.

EHLO example.com
250-LANG SE ES AU
LANG SE
250 Ok
BREV FRÅN:<>
250 Tack
BREV TILL:<hå[email protected]än.se>
250 Tack
INNEHÅLL
Subject: asdf

Hej!
.
250 Togs emot
HEJDÅ
250 Vi ses!

If you made it this far, April fool! We will publish information on the upcoming 4.6 release some time after the 1st of April.

Happy easter!

Halon Security receive $ 1.8 million in venture capital and appoints new CEO

Swedish email security and infrastructure company Halon Security has received $ 1.8 million in venture capital. The main investors are K-Svets Venture and the existing owners, and the money will be put towards a heavy expansion in the coming years. In connection to this, the company also appoints Martin Fabiansson as new CEO.

Halon, that is based in Gothenburg, Sweden, has grown steadily since the first investment from Chalmers Innovation Seed Fund and Almi Invest in 2013. The company has twelve employees, but are planning to hire plenty of more people in the next three years.

In connection to the investment, co-founder Peter Falck steps down as CEO. New CEO is Martin Fabiansson, who has a solid management background from both security and software development in companies such as AT&T, Oracle and THALES in both Sweden and USA.

Halon customers are mainly email service providers. The software Halon Platform is used to build the infrastructure that is needed to handle large amounts of in-transit email, including both security and operational features. Dutch telco KPN and Danish web hosting company One.com are examples of Halon customers.

2017 was a very good year for Halon, as we landed several important new customers. Based on this we could secure the financing round and scale up on both tech and sales, says Håkan Krook, Fund Manager at Chalmers Ventures.

Halon is an exciting company with a product that is highly appreciated in the industry, and I look forward to the challenge of taking Halon to the next level, says CEO Martin Fabiansson.

Contact:

Håkan Krook, Fund Manager, Chalmers Ventures
[email protected], +46 708 990 461

Martin Fabiansson, CEO, Halon Security AB
[email protected], +46 738 200 199